728x90 ad code [Header - SiteWide]
 
|

NO FOREIGN VOCABULARY

Courtesy : THE TIMES OF INDIA
Date : June 13, 2011

 

RANJANA SAXENA, HEAD OF DEPARTMENT, SLAVONIC & FINNO-UGRIAN STUDIES, DELHI UNIVERSITY, TELLS AADITI ISAAC WHY THIS IS THE RIGHT TIME TO LEARN HUNGARIAN

AT a time when extra skills are an added advantage in the job market, foreign language skills can make a big difference. And the more unusual the language, the more the demand for it. In fact, with India and Hungary strengthening their ties, a language like Hungarian can certainly be an asset.

Students interested in learning the language can apply to Delhi University (DU), which provides a part-time, one-year certificate and diploma programme in Hungarian. Ranjana Saxena, head of department, Slavonic & Finno-Ugrian Studies, explains, “Hungarian belongs to the Ugrian group of the Finno-Ugrian language family. Hungarian ancestors, while travelling to the Carpathian basin, passed through what is today known as Turkey. This is why the sound of some words is similar to Turkish and a lot of words are common to both the languages. Given the language’s relatively exotic nature and association with Budapest, there is a certain charm associated with knowing Hungarian.”

The department of Slavonic & Finno-Ugrian Studies at the DU is one of the prime centres for learning Hungarian in India. There are 40 seats for the course in DU. The part-time courses (beginners, intermediate and advanced) have six classes per-week and provide the structure to learn conversational Hungarian, elements of translation and acquaintance with important cultural and historical texts.

“The interest in academic research in the university is supported by the Bálint Institute that founded the Alexander Csoma de Körös Prize of Hungarian Studies, Delhi, in 2006, for students learning Hungarian,” informs Saxena.

There are visiting teachers from Hungary too. “Currently, the department helps its students informally. However, the department is actively working towards a formal system,” adds Saxena.

As to career prospects, Saxena says, “After a certificate or diploma programme, students can apply for scholarships in Hungary with the help of the department. They can also apply for advanced diplomas and higher education abroad; can work in the government ministries as translation officers or for MNCs like SAP, Oracle, Genpact, Wipro, etc. They can apply for tour guide licence and can work with national and international companies as interpreters/translators, or can also serve in the Embassy of Hungary in India.”

Forms for the course will be available from the third week of June from the department of Slavonic & Finno-Ugrian Studies at the Delhi University.

• HOW MANY SEATS 40 SEATS

• HOW MANY CLASSES PART-TIME COURSES — BEGINNERS, INTERMEDIATE AND ADVANCED — HAVE SIX CLASSES PER-WEEK

• WHAT DO I LEARN STRUCTURE OF CONVERSATIONAL HUNGARIAN, ELEMENTS OF TRANSLATION AND ACQUAINTANCE WITH IMPORTANT CULTURAL AND HISTORICAL TEXTS

468x60 ad code [Article page - Between comment and article]

Comments are closed